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AFRINIC Team Attends Capacity Building Workshop for the Africa Government Advisory Committee (GAC) in Kenya

Workshop led by the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) in collaboration with the Communications Authority of Kenya will explore ways to increase African Government Participation in ICANN and Policy Development.

 

24 January 2017 - Nairobi. AFRINIC has sent representatives to Kenya to take part in the ICANN/Communications Authority of Kenya’s Workshop for the Africa Government Advisory Committee. The workshop, themed “Harnessing the Potential of the Africa GAC Members for better Participation in ICANN”, is being held from 23-24 January 2017. The GAC provides advice to ICANN on issues of public policy and provides insight into instances where there may be an interaction between ICANN's activities or policies and national laws or international agreements within in the region.

“Governments are an integral part of the Internet industry and AFRINIC welcomes this opportunity to interact with African government representatives who are active in Internet governance,” comments Alan Barrett, CEO AFRINIC. “As Africa's supply of unused IPv4 addresses continues to run out, it is now more important than ever that governments, policy makers, business leaders and network operators come together to ensure that the African Internet continues to be developed in the most effective way. This includes the adoption of IPv6 and the increased use of Internet exchange points.”

This is the first regional workshop organised by ICANN’s recently established Nairobi Engagement Office. Joseph Mucheru, Cabinet Secretary Ministry of ICT – Republic of Kenya, opened the event, which was also addressed by Barrister Adebayo Shittu, Minister of ICT, Nigeria, Göran Marby, ICANN President & CEO, Thomas Schneider, GAC Chair, and Alice Munyua, co-chair of the GAC Under-served Regions working group, are also in attendance alongside the regional ICANN team, government representatives and community members.
While in Kenya, the AFRINIC team will also meet with representatives from the Ministry of ICT and other high level stakeholders in preparation for the upcoming Africa Internet Summit 2017 (AIS’17), which will be held in Nairobi from 21 May – 2 June 2017. The AIS is an annual, regional, multi-stakeholder ICT conference. It is the pinnacle educational and business ICT event in Africa where key players in the Internet industry interact with the global Internet community.

“The Africa GAC Workshop enables AFRINIC to talk directly with key government representatives to explain how policy development works in terms of Internet number resource distribution in Africa and beyond,” continues Mr. Barrett. “We have also been able to note that government participation in the AFRINIC policy development process is crucial and have extended a warm invitation to all participants in the GAC Workshop to attend the upcoming AIS’17, which is being organised by AFRINIC and The African Network Operators’ Group (AfNOG) and hosted by Tespok.”

 

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More Information

 

About the Africa Internet Summit (AIS):

The Africa Internet Summit (AIS) is an annual, regional, multi-stakeholder ICT conference. It is the pinnacle educational and business ICT event in Africa where key players in the Internet industry can interact with the global Internet community. Launched in The Gambia in 2012, the Summit consists of seminars, workshops, tutorials, conference sessions, birds-of-a-feather (BOFs), and other forums for sharing ICT knowledge within the African region. The Summit aims to bring the ICT business and technical community in Africa together under one roof to discuss ICT issues and challenges | www.internetsummitafrica.org

 

About ICANN’s Government Advisory Committee

The GAC is an advisory committee to ICANN, created under the ICANN ByLaws. It provides advice to ICANN on public policy aspects of ICANN’s responsibilities with regard to the Internet Domain Name System (DNS). The GAC is not a decision-making body. It advises ICANN on issues that are within ICANN’s scope | https://gacweb.icann.org

AFRINIC is Approaching IPv4 Exhaustion Phase 1

16 January 2017 - The AFRINIC IPv4 inventory will soon reach a point where the "Current Phase" will end, and "Exhaustion Phase 1" of the IPv4 Soft Landing policy will begin. This is an update on the implementation of the IPv4 Soft Landing policy.

AFRINIC's available inventory of IPv4 space is summarised here, updated daily.

 

SOFT LANDING POLICY

In 2011, the AFRINIC community passed an "IPv4 Soft Landing" policy to deal with the exhaustion of IPv4 address space.  That policy is currently described in Section 5.4 of the Consolidated Policy Manual. (It was earlier known under the identifier "AFPUB-2010-v4-005" as archived here).

The soft landing policy defines several phases for exhaustion of the IPv4 address space: the "Current Phase", "Exhaustion Phase 1", and "Exhaustion Phase 2".  These phases begin and end according to criteria defined in the policy, based on the amount of address space remaining in AFRINIC's IPv4 pool.

 

FINAL /8

The following definition of the "Final /8" appears in section 5.4.1 of the CPM:

The Final /8 block of IPv4 address space, or "Final /8", is the /8 block of IPv4 address space that has been allocated by the IANA to AFRINIC in terms of section 2.2 C of the Global Policy for the Allocation of the Remaining IPv4 Address Space at the time of exhaustion of the IANA pool of IPv4 address space.

Based on that definition, the "Final /8" is the IPv4 address block 102.0.0.0/8, which was allocated by the IANA to AFRINIC on 3 February 2011 (NRO news article) (AFRINIC news article).

 

CRITERIA FOR THE START OF EXHAUSTION PHASE 1

Section 5.4.2 of the CPM specifies the following criteria for the end of the Current Phase and the start of Exhaustion Phase 1:

The current phase will continue until an otherwise valid request for IPv4 address space from any LIR or end user to AFRINIC either:

(a) cannot be fulfilled with the IPv4 address space available in the AFRINIC pool (with the exception of the final /8), or

(b) can be fulfilled, but would leave the the AFRINIC IPv4 address pool empty (with the exception of the final /8).

AFRINIC will implement the specified criteria as follows.

When a request for IPv4 resources is approved but cannot be issued as a single contiguous block from the available inventory (excluding the final /8), the applicant will be given the option of receiving the resources as multiple smaller blocks instead (if there are sufficient smaller block to make that possible).  

If the applicant is willing to receive multiple smaller blocks adding up to the same amount of space as was approved, then the request is treated as "fulfilled".  If the applicant does not want multiple smaller blocks, or if there are not even enough smaller blocks to fulfil the approved request, then the request cannot be fulfilled, and Exhaustion Phase 1 will begin.  The applicant whose request was not fulfilled under the Current Phase may then receive no more than a /13 of IPv4 space under Exhaustion Phase 1.

It is also possible that an approved request under the Current Phase can be fulfilled (either as a single contiguous block or as multiple smaller blocks) but leaves the available IPv4 inventory empty (excluding the final /8).  In that case, Exhaustion Phase 1 will begin immediately after this request is approved, and will apply to all subsequent requests or any requests that are already in progress.

 

CHANGES IN EXHAUSTION PHASE 1

When Exhaustion Phase 1 begins, most current IPv4 policies continue to apply, but certain changes take effect:

  1. The minimum IPv4 allocation for LIRs will be /22, and the minimum IPv4 assignment for End User resource members will be /24. (CPM section 5.4.3.1.)
  2. Maximum IPv4 Allocation/Assignment shall be /13. (CPM section 5.4.3.1.)
  3. No explicit limit on the number of times an organization may request additional IPv4 space. (CPM section 5.4.4.)
  4. Allocation/Assignment period (planning window) changes from 12 months to 8 months. (CPM section 5.4.5.)
  5. Existing Resource Members are eligible to get additional blocks if 90% efficient usage of all resources has been demonstrated. (CPM section 5.4.6.1.)
  6. Use of AFRINIC IPv4 resources outside the AFRINIC service region should be solely in support of connectivity back to the AFRINIC region. (CPM section 5.4.6.2.)
  7. A /12 IPv4 address block will be reserved out of the final /8. This /12 IPv4 address block shall be preserved by AFRINIC for some future uses, as yet unforeseen.  (CPM section 5.4.7.)

 

CRITERIA FOR THE START OF EXHAUSTION PHASE 2

Exhaustion Phase 1 ends and Exhaustion Phase 2 begins when AFRINIC has no more than one /11 of non-reserved IPv4 space available in the final /8.  (CPM section 5.4.3.1.) The policy does not specify whether the /11 must be contiguous, or may be made up of multiple smaller blocks adding up to the same amount of space.

AFRINIC's interpretation is that the /11 may be made up of multiple smaller blocks.  Accordingly, Exhaustion Phase 2 will begin when the available non-reserved space in the final /8 is no more than 2097152 IP addresses (the same amount as a /11), regardless of how the available addresses are arranged in contiguous or discontiguous blocks.  Nevertheless, AFRINIC will endeavour to keep a contiguous /11 set aside for as long as reasonably feasible.

 

CHANGES IN EXHAUSTION PHASE 2

When Exhaustion Phase 2 begins, most of the IPv4 policies from Exhaustion Phase 1 continue to apply, but the following changes will take effect:

  1. Minimum IPv4 Allocation or Assignment shall be /24. (CPM section 5.4.3.2.)
  2. Maximum IPv4 Allocation or Assignment shall be /22. (CPM section 5.4.3.2.)

The following considerations from Exhaustion Phase 1 will continue to apply in Exhaustion Phase 2:

  1. No explicit limit on the number of times an organization may request additional IPv4 space. (CPM section 5.4.4.)
  2. Allocation/Assignment period (planning window) is 8 months. (CPM section 5.4.5.)
  3. Existing Resource Members are eligible to get additional blocks if 90% efficient usage of all resources has been demonstrated. (CPM section 5.4.6.1.)
  4. Use of AFRINIC IPv4 resources outside the AFRINIC service region should be solely in support of connectivity back to the AFRINIC region. (CPM section 5.4.6.2.)

 

   

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