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Here is an overview of news, activities and and events from last month in case you missed something:

  • 02 February: After several AFRINIC members reporting receiving emails bearing the AFRINIC logo and soliciting the sale or lease of IPv4 address blocks, we reminded the community that the use of this logo was not authorised and that the current policy does not allow for sale or trade of IPv4 address space. 

  • 10 February: The call for volunteers for the 2016 NomCom was issued. 

  • 11 February: We opened the call for presentations for the upcoming Africa Internet Summit 2016 (AIS'16).

  • 24 February: The list of countries selected to host the AFRINIC IPv6 and Internet Number Resource Management Workshops in 2016 was published

  • 25 February: The selected members of the NomCom 2016 was announced. 

You can keep up-to-date with the latest AFRINIC news at:

Mwendwa Kivuva, AFRINIC community member, explains how African organisations would  benefit from becoming a member of AFRINIC and his concern over the low Internet penetration rate in the African region in this article published by the Daily Nation.

"In the first week of December, an important meeting, the Africa Network Information Center (AFRINIC-23) took place in Pointe Noire, Congo-Brazzaville, to discuss Internet Number resources policies in Africa..."

 

Read the full article on the Daily Nation here.

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We share with you an article on AFRINIC's experience in migrating an OpenDNSSEC signer. Contributors from AFRINIC are : David Njuki (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.Amreesh Phokeer (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.), Logan Velvindron (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) and Alain Aina (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.).

AFRINIC policies are a set of guidelines and processes that determine the manner in which Internet Number Resources (IPv4 Addresses, IPv6 Addresses and Autonomous System Numbers) are distributed by AFRINIC to operators of IP networks in Africa. The method through which these policies are developed (commonly referred to as the Policy Development Process, or PDP) is open, transparent and bottom up. 

Policies are developed by the Policy Development Working Group - PDWG, which constitutes anyone, anywhere that is interested in participating to Policy Development in the region, irrespective of nationality, gender, age, race, wealth and health. The PDWG is administered by two co-chairs, also elected by the same community that constitutes it, at AFRINIC Public Policy Meetings. 

Ernest Byaruhanga, AFRINIC's Policy Coordinator provides us with an update on the recent policy discussions in the AFRINIC service region.

With less than 30 million IPv4 addresses left in the AFRINIC inventory, it’s not surprising that policy discussions in the region have been centred around IPv4 conservation and exhaustion. During the 23rd AFRINIC Public Policy Meeting held in Pointe Noire in December 2015, the following policy proposals were discussed at length:

 

 

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